Reserve Judge Advocates & Legalmen

Officers

As a Navy Reserve judge advocate you’ll enjoy a challenging part-time career that maximizes your legal talents. You’ll work with professionals from all walks of life, including private practice, state and federal government, and private industry. And you’ll serve your country in uniform.

The Navy Reserve JAG Corps currently has more than 400 lawyers practicing in the fields of military justice, international and operational law, legal assistance, admiralty, and other specialized areas. They serve throughout the United States and in several foreign countries.

Pay and Benefits

Reserve officers receive pay that varies depending on grade, length of service, and degree of participation. They’re also eligible for numerous federal benefits including full-time Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance; access to military exchanges, commissaries, and theaters; and, after they have completed 20 years of qualifying service, generous retirement benefits. Although the retirement benefits for Reservists are similar to those for active duty members, Reservists do not begin receiving most of those benefits, including retirement pay, until reaching retirement eligible age (generally 60).

To learn more about benefits, visit NavyReserve.com.

Reserve Drills

As a rule, Reserve drills last four hours. Four drills fill a typical drill weekend, Saturday and Sunday, 0730-1630. You drill the equivalent of one weekend a month (48 drills per year). You may also be required to complete two weeks of annual training (AT) each fiscal year. Most Reserve judge advocate billets are in the Selected Reserve, where you are paid for drills and annual training. Annual training provides day-for-day basic pay and allowances.

Affiliating with the Reserve

Currently the U.S. Navy Reserve does not offer direct appointments for judge advocates.  But active duty or Navy Reserve officers are eligible to join the Navy JAG Corps Reserve. The Navy Reserve JAG Corps also welcomes certified judge adviocates from other branches of service. An officer recruiter can assist interested officers in the process.

The Navy recently created a Career Transition Office (CTO) that will contact individuals as they leave active duty.  Among other items, the CTO will ascertain whether individuals are interested in affiliating with the Reserve.  But if your release from active duty was before 29 May 2009, and you've already been working with a recruiter, then please continue to work with a Navy recruiter to affiliate with the Reserve.

Junior officers affiliating with the Navy Reserve JAG Corps may be eligible for an affiliation bonus.

Enlisted

An integral part of the Navy Reserve legal team, Legalmen assist attorneys in all areas of practice. Some work in the courtroom and prepare records of trial. Others work on command staffs drafting official correspondence and reports. Legalmen are relied upon for their intelligence and ability to work with little supervision. Their knowledge and advice help countless Sailors throughout the Fleet.

Pay and Benefits

Legalmen receive pay that varies depending on grade, length of service, and degree of participation. They’re also eligible for numerous federal benefits including full-time Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance; access to military exchanges, commissaries, and theaters; and, after they have completed 20 years of qualifying service, generous retirement benefits. Although the retirement benefits for Reservists are similar to those for active duty members, Reservists do not begin receiving most of those benefits, including retirement pay, until reaching retirement eligible age (generally 60).

To learn more, see the Enlisted Benefits on Navy Reserve.

Earn College Credit

The Navy JAG Corps provides opportunities for advanced training as paralegals, court reporters, and in other administrative and clerical duties. And some of that training may translate to credit hours toward a bachelor’s or associate’s degree.

Find a Recruiter

To enlist as a Reserve Legalman, Contact Your Local Recruiter.